reblogged 1 minute ago
20 Oct 2014 638 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #tf?    #lol at the comments  

You can keep fuckin that dog if you want to, just don’t expect me to take care of the puppies.

~

Said to a person who won’t let a toxic person go. African American Proverb (via blkproverbs)

I’ve never heard this in life.

(via dynastylnoire)

This don’t sound nothing like a blk person would say. We don’t fuck dogs

(via bulma-esque)

Never in my Black ass life have I heard this. 

Sounds like somebody submitted something anonymously and blkproverbs wasn’t paying too close attention. 

(via tashabilities)

same here. this sounds like some duck dynasty country yeehaw white proverb…

(via saturnineaqua)

YOOOOOOOOOOO ROFL ^^^^^^

(via dynastylnoire)

What kinda backwoods honky tonk yee haw nonsense is this

(via black-culture)

 
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reblogged 17 minutes ago
20 Oct 2014 22,622 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #q'd post  

rendzina:

Over coffee with my mom this morning: “Sometimes we hesitate to invite people into our life because we feel like our space isn’t good enough yet. things are a little messy, or our place settings don’t match, or our situation isn’t quite what we want it to be. don’t let that stop you. invite people in anyway.”
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reblogged 1 hour ago
20 Oct 2014 13,778 notes
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reblogged 1 hour ago
20 Oct 2014 304 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #capitalism    #college    #education    #poverty  
ethiopienne:

Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong

America is the land of opportunity, just for some more than others.
That’s because, in large part, inequality starts in the crib. Rich parents can afford to spend more time and money on their kids, and that gap has only grown the past few decades. Indeed, economists Greg Duncan and Richard Murnane calculate that, between 1972 and 2006, high-income parents increased their spending on “enrichment activities” for their children by 151 percent in inflation-adjusted terms, compared to 57 percent for low-income parents.
But, of course, it’s not just a matter of dollars and cents. It’s also a matter of letters and words. Affluent parents talk to their kids three more hours a week on average than poor parents, which is critical during a child’s formative early years. That’s why, as Stanford professor Sean Reardonexplains, “rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed in school than middle-class students,” and they’re staying that way.
It’s an educational arms race that’s leaving many kids far, far behind.
It’s depressing, but not nearly so much as this:
Even poor kids who do everything right don’t do much better than rich kids who do everything wrong. Advantages and disadvantages, in other words, tend to perpetuate themselves. You can see that in the above chart, based on a new paper from Richard Reeves and Isabel Sawhill, presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s annual conference, which is underway.
Specifically, rich high school dropouts remain in the top about as much as poor college grads stay stuck in the bottom — 14 versus 16 percent, respectively. Not only that, but these low-income strivers are just as likely to end up in the bottom as these wealthy ne’er-do-wells. Some meritocracy.
What’s going on? Well, it’s all about glass floors and glass ceilings. Rich kids who can go work for the family business — and, in Canada at least, 70 percent of the sons of the top 1 percent do just that — or inherit the family estate don’t need a high school diploma to get ahead. It’s an extreme example of what economists call “opportunity hoarding.” That includes everything from legacy college admissions to unpaid internships that let affluent parents rig the game a little more in their children’s favor.
But even if they didn’t, low-income kids would still have a hard time getting ahead. That’s, in part, because they’re targets for diploma mills that load them up with debt, but not a lot of prospects. And even if they do get a good degree, at least when it comes to black families, they’re more likely to still live in impoverished neighborhoods that keep them disconnected from opportunities.
It’s not quite a heads-I-win, tails-you-lose game where rich kids get better educations, yet still get ahead even if they don’t—but it’s close enough. And if it keeps up, the American Dream will be just that.

ethiopienne:

Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong

America is the land of opportunity, just for some more than others.

That’s because, in large part, inequality starts in the crib. Rich parents can afford to spend more time and money on their kids, and that gap has only grown the past few decades. Indeed, economists Greg Duncan and Richard Murnane calculate that, between 1972 and 2006, high-income parents increased their spending on “enrichment activities” for their children by 151 percent in inflation-adjusted terms, compared to 57 percent for low-income parents.

But, of course, it’s not just a matter of dollars and cents. It’s also a matter of letters and words. Affluent parents talk to their kids three more hours a week on average than poor parents, which is critical during a child’s formative early years. That’s why, as Stanford professor Sean Reardonexplains, “rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed in school than middle-class students,” and they’re staying that way.

It’s an educational arms race that’s leaving many kids far, far behind.

It’s depressing, but not nearly so much as this:

Even poor kids who do everything right don’t do much better than rich kids who do everything wrong. Advantages and disadvantages, in other words, tend to perpetuate themselves. You can see that in the above chart, based on a new paper from Richard Reeves and Isabel Sawhill, presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s annual conference, which is underway.

Specifically, rich high school dropouts remain in the top about as much as poor college grads stay stuck in the bottom — 14 versus 16 percent, respectively. Not only that, but these low-income strivers are just as likely to end up in the bottom as these wealthy ne’er-do-wells. Some meritocracy.

What’s going on? Well, it’s all about glass floors and glass ceilings. Rich kids who can go work for the family business — and, in Canada at least, 70 percent of the sons of the top 1 percent do just that — or inherit the family estate don’t need a high school diploma to get ahead. It’s an extreme example of what economists call “opportunity hoarding.” That includes everything from legacy college admissions to unpaid internships that let affluent parents rig the game a little more in their children’s favor.

But even if they didn’t, low-income kids would still have a hard time getting ahead. That’s, in part, because they’re targets for diploma mills that load them up with debt, but not a lot of prospects. And even if they do get a good degree, at least when it comes to black families, they’re more likely to still live in impoverished neighborhoods that keep them disconnected from opportunities.

It’s not quite a heads-I-win, tails-you-lose game where rich kids get better educations, yet still get ahead even if they don’t—but it’s close enough. And if it keeps up, the American Dream will be just that.

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reblogged 2 hours ago
20 Oct 2014 88 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #ebola    #for the ebola ignorance  

Ebola is not the first transnational deadly health epidemic that has plagued the globe in my lifetime and let alone in this century. What has however colored the Ebola dynamic is the way in which we discuss the issue which we must be careful not to overwhelm with traditional racist and anti-Africa sentiments. It is time the world stops stringently holding on to an image of Africa as land of the unhealthy, starving poor. Africans are an ingenious, resilient, and innovative people who are dedicated and making strides every day to improve upon their own situations as well as international ones. What Africa suffers from is ironically not unlike the disease many members of the American Congress have succumbed to… (often) deliberate and intentional paralysis to act. Some call it lack of political will. I’m sure lobbyists and international banks probably have another fancy term for it.

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reblogged 2 hours ago
20 Oct 2014 2,138 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #st louis  

Today is Racist Fuckery (10.20.14): At yesterday’s protest outside the St Louis Rams game, racist fans got rowdy and physical. Who got arrested? Two of the protesters, of course. Mike Brown means we have to fight back. #staywoke

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reblogged 2 hours ago
20 Oct 2014 5,251 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #lol at the caption    #she did tho    #XD    #footwork    #vine  

nxnsense:

kumagawa:

sHE CAME OUT LIKE A FUCKING RPG FINAL BOSS oMF

AHHHHHHH 😂😂😂😂

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reblogged 2 hours ago
20 Oct 2014 6,521 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #burn these fucks!    #rape tw    #rape culture    #TF!  

angelica-aswald:

maldivaldandhiddled:

heliolisk:

heteroh:

rape culture hasn’t gone anywhere

wtf did I just read

WTAF??!!!! ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME??!!!??!!

they need to die.

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reblogged 3 hours ago
20 Oct 2014 213 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #WTF!    #racism    #Brazil    #freakin wow  
mediadiversified:

Brazil’s new primetime show “Sex and the Niggaz” serves the white gaze
by Blogueiras Negras
TV Channel Globo, one of the largest television networks in Brazil, is broadcasting a series called “Sexo e as Nega”. The series is an adaptation of Sex and the City, but this time with four Black actresses. The series has been written by the famous White actor, writer and producer Miguel Fallabella.
The very title of the series is itself hugely problematic, not only because race is the primary signifier of the women, but also because the terms are full of racist and gendered connotations, such as the venacular Brazilian expression “I’m not your niggaz “. In racist discourses, Black women are those who work for sex, while the white woman is the woman who is worthy of romantic love, kindness and respect. These same dualities are repeated in “Sexo e as Nega”, where the main character is a white woman who seeks love, while the black women live only for sex, which reminds us of another Brazilian expression which also has its roots in slavery and has remained practically unchanged – “White women are for marriage, mulatas are for fucking and black women are for work”.
View more: http://mediadiversified.org/2014/10/18/brazils-new-primetime-show-sex-and-the-niggaz-serves-the-white-gaze/

mediadiversified:

Brazil’s new primetime show “Sex and the Niggaz” serves the white gaze

by Blogueiras Negras

TV Channel Globo, one of the largest television networks in Brazil, is broadcasting a series called “Sexo e as Nega”. The series is an adaptation of Sex and the City, but this time with four Black actresses. The series has been written by the famous White actor, writer and producer Miguel Fallabella.

The very title of the series is itself hugely problematic, not only because race is the primary signifier of the women, but also because the terms are full of racist and gendered connotations, such as the venacular Brazilian expression “I’m not your niggaz “. In racist discourses, Black women are those who work for sex, while the white woman is the woman who is worthy of romantic love, kindness and respect. These same dualities are repeated in “Sexo e as Nega”, where the main character is a white woman who seeks love, while the black women live only for sex, which reminds us of another Brazilian expression which also has its roots in slavery and has remained practically unchanged – “White women are for marriage, mulatas are for fucking and black women are for work”.

View more: http://mediadiversified.org/2014/10/18/brazils-new-primetime-show-sex-and-the-niggaz-serves-the-white-gaze/

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reblogged 3 hours ago
20 Oct 2014 3,890 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #ferguson  
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reblogged 4 hours ago
20 Oct 2014 35,752 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #gifset    #the daily show  

sandandglass:

Bryan Stevenson on The Daily Show.

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